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Wallpapers tagged with 'Scene: Astronomy'.

Each wallpaper on InterfaceLIFT has been tagged with keywords, allowing you to browse for similar content, whether it be by Color, Scene, Location, Medium, Event, Equipment, or Subject.

You are currently browsing the 99 desktop wallpapers that were tagged with 'Scene: Astronomy', beginning with the most popular images. You are on page 4 of 10.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Orion Nebula in the Infrared by Christopher
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Orion Nebula in the Infrared

January 18th, 2013

ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA.
Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit

This wide-field view of the Orion Nebula (Messier 42), lying about 1350 light-years from Earth, was taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile. The new telescope's huge field of view allows the whole nebula and its surroundings to be imaged in a single picture and its infrared vision also means that it can peer deep into the normally hidden dusty regions and reveal the curious antics of the very active young stars buried there. This image was created from images taken through Z, J and Ks filters in the near-infrared part of the spectrum. The exposure times were ten minutes per filter. The image covers a region of sky about one degree by 1.5 degrees.

Full press release: http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1006/

Original image: http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1006a/

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Moon Rise by Phil2001
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Moon Rise

April 14th, 2011

Inspired by an image taken from the International Space Station (ISS) in 1999. I was amazed by it but felt the quality was poor. So i created my own to use as my wallpaper and decided to share. I hope you like it :)

Adobe Photoshop CS4

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Amazing Milky Way by Jonathan Besler
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Amazing Milky Way

March 20th, 2012

Taken in Hinterstein, Bavaria, Germany in a very clear night some time before the Moon got visible. I hope you like it!

Canon EOS 550D, Tokina AT-X 116 PRO DX.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Carina Nebula by Christopher
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Carina Nebula

February 22nd, 2013

ESO's VLT reveals the Carina Nebula's hidden secrets.

This broad panorama of the Carina Nebula, a region of massive star formation in the southern skies, was taken in infrared light using the HAWK-I camera on ESO's Very Large Telescope. Many previously hidden features, scattered across a spectacular celestial landscape of gas, dust and young stars, have emerged.

Credit: ESO/T. Preibisch

http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1208a/

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Nightfall at Lake Aurora by Dominic Kamp
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Nightfall at Lake Aurora

July 31st, 2014

Composite of one of my Iceland Aurora shots (available on my homepage as wallpaper) and an old photo of Bannalpsee (Lake Bannalp) in Switzerland.

Once I finished combining the Aurora sky with the once daylight scenery of Bannalpsee, I used Flaming Pear's great Photoshop plugin -Flood- to create the Aurora reflections. I little tweak merges both layers so that the original ripples are combined with the new "fake" ripples of the Aurora sky. Then I mostly corrected minor artifacts and color fringing and last but not least, used Nik Color Efex to play around with the colors.

Let me know in the comments whether you liked it or what you'd improve. Enjoy!

Adobe Photoshop CC, Nik Color Efex 4.0, Flaming Pear Flood.

Nikon D800, Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED.

Photo Settings: 15mm, f/2, 30 seconds, ISO 800.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper What I Missed During Cryosleep by debichu
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What I Missed During Cryosleep

June 10th, 2010

I've been in love with the Orion Nebula by chriscologne for quite a while, so I made my own nebula, which I would have missed 'cause I'd be in cryosleep to, uhm, whereever I would be going. Or something... I don't know exactly.

Apophysis and loads of Adobe Photoshop CS4.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Down Under Stars by Dominic Kamp
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Down Under Stars

May 27th, 2012

Sydney Harbour Bridge, taken from the north side bay overlooking the skyline of Sydney, Australia. The sky has been replaced with an original Australian starry sky that was taken near Ayers Rock.

Nikon D800, Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED shot at f/6.3. Adobe Photoshop CS5.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper The Eleventh Hour by Dominic Kamp
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The Eleventh Hour

October 16th, 2015

This picture has been taken in 2013 in Corsica. It shows Ajaccio on the opposite shore, the main capital of this French island. Originally I wanted to further abstract the sky with falling stars but gave it a pass as most people probably don't like that. If you're still interested to see it, head over to my website and have a look.

Adobe Photoshop CS.

Nikon D800, Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED.

Photo Settings: 10mm, f/3, 1/100 second, ISO 160.

Map: 41.8453, 8.7519

High-resolution desktop wallpaper PIA08329: In Saturn's Shadow by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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PIA08329: In Saturn's Shadow

November 12th, 2006

This marvelous panoramic view was created by combining a total of 165 images taken by the Cassini wide-angle camera over nearly three hours on Sept. 15, 2006. The full mosaic consists of three rows of nine wide-angle camera footprints; only a portion of the full mosaic is shown here. Color in the view was created by digitally compositing ultraviolet, infrared and clear filter images and was then adjusted to resemble natural color.

With giant Saturn hanging in the blackness and sheltering Cassini from the sun's blinding glare, the spacecraft viewed the rings as never before, revealing previously unknown faint rings and even glimpsing its home world.

The mosaic images were acquired as the spacecraft drifted in the darkness of Saturn's shadow for about 12 hours, allowing a multitude of unique observations of the microscopic particles that compose Saturn's faint rings.

Ring structures containing these tiny particles brighten substantially at high phase angles: i.e., viewing angles where the sun is almost directly behind the objects being imaged.

During this period of observation Cassini detected two new faint rings: one coincident with the shared orbit of the moons Janus and Epimetheus, and another coincident with Pallene's orbit. (See PIA08322 and PIA08328 for more on the two new rings.)

The narrowly confined G ring is easily seen here, outside the bright main rings. Encircling the entire system is the much more extended E ring. The icy plumes of Enceladus, whose eruptions supply the E ring particles, betray the moon's position in the E ring's left-side edge.

Interior to the G ring and above the brighter main rings is the pale dot of Earth. Cassini views its point of origin from over a billion kilometers (and close to a billion miles) away in the icy depths of the outer solar system. See PIA08324 for a similar view of Earth taken during this observation.

Small grains are pushed about by sunlight and electromagnetic forces. Hence, their distribution tells much about the local space environment.

A second version of the mosaic view is presented here in which the color contrast is greatly exaggerated. In such views, imaging scientists have noticed color variations across the diffuse rings that imply active processes sort the particles in the ring according to their sizes.

Looking at the E ring in this color-exaggerated view, the distribution of color across and along the ring appears to be different between the right side and the left. Scientists are not sure yet how to explain these differences, though the difference in phase angle between right and left may be part of the explanation. The phase angle is about 179 degrees on Saturn.

The main rings are overexposed in a few places.

This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 15 degrees above the ringplane.

Cassini was approximately 2.2 million kilometers (1.3 million miles) from Saturn when the images in this mosaic were taken. Image scale on Saturn is about 260 kilometers (162 miles) per pixel.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

High-resolution desktop wallpaper Amazing Milky Way III by Jonathan Besler
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Amazing Milky Way III

July 26th, 2012

Shot from the mountain "Imberger Horn" above Bad Hindelang in Bavaria, Germany.

After hiking up in the dark for about two hours I got the gift of this perfect view.

Also check out the panorama I took an hour before this shot.

I hope you like it! :)

Canon EOS Rebel T2i, Tokina AT-X Pro 11-16mm f/2.8 DX.

Photo Settings: 11mm, f/5, ISO 400.

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